Elephant Skin Stone p/kg


R45.00

Elephant Skin Stone is a sedimentary rock composed of mostly calcium magnesium carbonate. Commonly referred to as weathered Dolomite Rock.

Placing this rock in freshwater setups would not be recommended as softwater thriving inhabitants would suffer from a sudden PH level increase.

Due to each stone being unique in size and weight we will contact you once we receive your order to confirm courier cost. So please withhold payment till such time we have send you the final invoice.

5 in stock

Description

Elephant Skin Stone is a sedimentary rock composed of mostly calcium magnesium carbonate. Commonly referred to as weathered Dolomite Rock and Dolomitic Limestone, this stone is the result of Dolostones that have been chemically weathered from wind and rain penetration. Often sold as a medical supplement as well as an industrial product, this rock has become a very popular stone to use in aquariums as a background scape and centerpiece.

Depending on the state of impurities like metal mixed into the composition, Elephant Skin Stone will either be various shades of gray or reddish-brown. Oxidized iron and magnesium will cause the rock to appear browner or reddish-brown.

The texture of the Elephant Skin Stone is quite self-explanatory. When Dolomite is worn down from water and wind, the surface takes on a unique resemblance to that of an elephant’s skin. This texture makes the stone extremely valuable for hobbyists looking to use it in many types of vivariums.

The density of Dolomite is an average of 2.85 grams per centimeter cubed. This would make the rock rather heavy to work within large amounts. Due to its rarity, most enthusiasts opt to use this stone very selectively, either way, making it less liable to potential damage.

The high PH/hardness influence would make the Elephant Skin Stone ideal for hard water as well as saltwater ecosystems. Placing this rock in freshwater setups would not be recommended as softwater thriving inhabitants would suffer from a sudden PH level increase.

I would preferably use this rock in vivariums and aquariums that are exclusively built for harder water conditions and saltwater environments.

Never place the rock on the bare bottom of the tank or up against the side glass. The concentrated levels of pressure focused on the edge of the rock could cause the glass to crack.